Wording - Love Notes - Invitations + Stationery - Wording


Wording

Although finding the right paper is important, it's only the beginning.  After all sending out blank invitations might defeat the purpose of having made the tough paper decision in the first place...

Mr and Mrs John McFadden
together with
Dr and Mrs Stephen Williams
OR
Stacey McFadden and Peter Williams
 
request the pleasure of
your company/the company of
David and Lisa
 
at the marriage of their daughter
Stacey Anne to Peter Ian Williams
OR
at their forthcoming marriage
 
at St Johns Uniting Church
cnr Douglas Street and Mona Vale Road, St Ives
on Saturday, 24th November 2016
at 4:00pm in the afternoon
and afterwards at Mandalay
72 Burns Bay Road, Lane Cove
at 6:30pm
RSVP by 29th October 2016
17 Warehouse Road,
St Ives  NSW  2075

An Invite by any other name...

Your invitation usually begins with a name (or several names).  According to etiquette the names of the hosts of the wedding are included first.  These are the people who funded your designer gown and the other elements of your wedding.  So if your mum and dad paid the bill, their names should be included - the same is true for your in-laws.  If you and your fiancé forked our for everything, then technically your parents don't need to be mentioned.  But as you well know, some things are about love, not money, and it's a nice gesture to add their names anyway.

Say the right thing

Names are a good start, but no matter how nice, they're not enough.  You need to add a few words to let your guests in on the whats, wheres and whens.  You can do this in a couple of ways.

Keeping with tradition

If you're hopelessly romantic and would like to use the same wording as your mother did, you've made your job rather easy.  Simply place your details into the classic template and voila - you're part of family tradition!  Naturally if certain elements don't agree with you, changing them doesn't make you any less traditional - for example your mum might prefer; 'Mrs Sandra and Mr John McFadden.'  If you have time add a personal touch by including your guests names - your Great Auntie Maude will be thrilled to see her name in print!

Wild Child

Rules are made to be broken!  If you don't like the traditional wording, make up your own.  "Suzie and Rob would like to invite you to their wedding, at St Mary's Cathedral..."  As long as you clearly state the date, the time and the address, anything goes.  So grab a pen and let your imagination run wild.

Gorgeous chalkboards for displaying at your wedding ceremony and/or reception.  These chalkboards use real chalkboard with printed artwork. Hand lettered and hand made in Brisbane, Australia.Once the words are on paper, be sure to proofread them with great care.  Typos are your biggest enemy.  Your new uncle-in-law, Mr Snelly, will never forgive you for having turned his "n" into an "m" - too bad he has a fabulous holiday house on Fraser Island!  So make sure to check, double check and triple check!

Checkmate!

Once the words are on paper, be sure to proofread them with great care.  Typos are your biggest enemy.  Your new uncle-in-law, Mr Snelly, will never forgive you for having turned his "n" into an "m" - too bad he has a fabulous holiday house on Fraser Island!  So make sure to check, double check and triple check!

 What's your type?

Now that you know what you're writing, have a think about the typeface that will best suit your magnificent wording.  Be careful, not only does this have to look marvellous but it helps if your guests can read it.  So although the Giddup or Bickham Script fonts may appeal to your sense of style, they may not be the best ones to use.  There should always be a good balance between the aesthetic and the practical - 'readable' should always win over 'decorative', or your guests may show up dressed in macaroons rather than the maroon colour theme!  A good compromise is to print your guests names in a fancy, scripted font and use a plain one for the rest of the wording. This way you can have a delicate feel without compromising on legibility.

Shared from Modern Wedding magazine